Financial hardships aside, Greek animators continue to produce interesting films in the 7th Animfest festival, Athens.

 The 7th Animfest (1-7 March 2012) has gathered a strong participation of internationally well-known films, such as Luminaris (Juan Pablo Zaramella), and the Spanish Grand Prix (Marc Solanas & Anna Riba), and its 7-part competition program is a meditative look on the current situation worldwide.

The stop-motion film Stones by the Slovakian Katarína Kerekesová was a new age opera, and a must-see tragic story of a woman torn between duty and love in a stone construction.

here is also a strong alliance with and a tribute to the puppet masters of the Czech Republic, from the patriach Jiri Trnka to the folk yet philosophically-minded recent work of Maur Films (look for the vivid parabole of  Reason and Luck) dir. Kristina Dufková, Vlasta Pospíšilová, David Súkup.

Greeks don't let the crisis melt their efforts. Aristarchos Papadaniel and Sophia Mandouvalou presented an extended version of their 3-year project, A Letter, A story, a courageous effort to teach kids the Greek language through vibrant animated films.

 On the other hand, the Greek competitive section features sarcasm, pure humour (and sometimes downright anger) on the current financial situation. Yet the most impressive Greek films decided to sidestep the matter altogether, and talk instead about personal-emotional issues (Dream of Living - A. Kokorikou, P. Kokkali), existence and death (Abeyance - Eleni Miltsi), and even Dali's dreams (Oneironats - Luis Santos) and Japanese folk tales (Fountain of youth - P. Rappas).

 The 7th Animfest festival concludes today (7 March) with the awards ceremony.